The Ultimate Guide to Life Coach Salaries

Want to know how to make a good living as a coach? We've got answers!

Read Article →

20 Hottest Life Coaching Niches for 2021... And Beyond

How do you differentiate yourself as a life coach? Choose a specialty.

Read Article →

2021 State of Life Coaching & The Wellness Economy

Make the most of emerging trends within this $4.5 trillion industry.

Read Article →

Why Choose JRNI Life Coach Training?

You’ve got choices. time to find out if we check all your boxes!

Read Article →
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

View By Category

Inspiration
Manifestation Techniques for Men: Feeling Your Way Into A Daily Practice
Guest blog by Coach Joe Longo
Team JRNI
Sep 22, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Inspiration
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

Guest blog by Joe Longo

Joe Longo

From college football player to a photographer to an executive-level manager at the university level to a self-employed creative to an intuitive manifestation coach - it’s safe to say Joe Longo has lived many lives. It's these real-world experiences that pushed him to study with JRNI, and dive into an evidence-based coaching style using Positive Psychology, mindfulness, and the power of intention and practice to create our best life and achieve our goals.

A 2020 graduate of the JRNI Coach Training program, Joe is focused on helping others find the LIGHT WITHIN and help awaken a deep desire and passion to live with a sense of purpose for something greater than yourself. Alongside his life coaching practice, Joe is also a freelance photographer, and a yoga and meditation teacher focused on manifestation and mindset. You can follow his work on Instagram @inspirecreatemanifest, TikTok, or by visiting website www.inspirecreatemanifest.com.


Manifestation Techniques for Men

“Feeling a state produces that state.” ― Neville Goddard

When we look at this quote we can easily get all the fuzzy feelings and think: “All I need to do is feel and I can create that state of what I want!” But for most men, we have been told not to feel, to suppress our feelings. The messages we’ve received are to be strong, that men don't cry, and to just suck it up and keep going. 

A couple of weeks ago I held a Men's Manifestation information night as a way to connect with men and inquire about the struggles they may have with goal setting, manifesting, and creating a daily practice to support them on their journey. 

Some of the things that came to the surface included:

  1. Men are taught that anger is one of the only feelings we are free to express. 
  2. Crying is weak... unless you are crying over a sporting event. 
  3. Asking for help is a sign of weakness.
  4. Most men have very broad goals such as financial freedom, family security, free time with family, friends, and loved ones, and job advancement.  

As we dive into the teachings of Neville Goddard (author of The Feeling is the Secret)  and Napoleon Hill (Think and Grow Rich), we discover that a person must feel as if your wish has already been fulfilled to allow that manifestation to come to life. So how do we do that?

When it comes to manifestations, you need to be specific.

You need to put a timeline on your goals, then find a balance between letting go and allowing, and putting in the inspired action to bring it all to life. You need to be grateful and enjoy the journey, and move into the feeling of the wish already being fulfilled.

What I've discovered in my work is that many men are starting from a place of low vibration, typically from a space of anger. We’re talking about feelings like:

  • I hate my job
  • I hate my boss
  • I want to punch my whole office in the nose! 

If we are spending most of our time in anger, guess what we are attracting? MORE ANGER! 

We are energy, in constant motion vibrating with our emotions and feelings. David R. Hawkins, M.D., Ph.D. developed a Map of Consciousness, which presents a diagram of vibrational states of being in his book Power vs. Force. Most men are in the force or hyperactivity area of the Map of Consciousness that can lead us to try too hard, which in turn has a way of blocking everything we actually want. 

So how do we as men move from force into power, happiness, and productivity... ascending up the Map of Consciousness?

Start small! 

You don't have to give up sports, or beers and wings with friends. Instead, we start by bringing more awareness to the present moment. That usually begins by developing a daily practice of mindfulness to support you.  

What does a “daily practice” look like? 

1) Sleep

You're not a stronger man if you only sleep 3 hours a night. Your body needs rest to function at peak performance. The average adult needs between 7-9 hours of sleep each night to be at our best. For most of us, it means that anything less puts us in a deficit before the day even begins. If we go to bed and wake up at the same time every day, we can reinforce the circadian rhythm which will in turn make going to sleep at the same time easier. This helps ensure that we are ready for the day. 

2) Meditation / Breathwork

We are learning more and more every day about the power of the breath and the benefits of meditation. You don’t need to sit cross-legged on a pillow for 30 minutes every morning to get the benefits. A 2-5 minute daily practice is  a fine way to start.

3) Journal

Take 5 minutes every morning to check in with yourself in writing. Ask yourself: who do I need to show up for today? How do I need to show up for myself? Then move into gratitude for the day, and make note of all that you have. Every night look back on your day with gratitude for all you learned and accomplished and be kind to yourself.

4) Inspiration

Give yourself 5-10 minutes of inspiring content in the morning. This could be from a book, podcast, YouTube video, or other source. Anything that will give you a shot of inspiration for the day.  

Give it a try for 7 days.

Notice how you feel when you start the day off with an intentional morning practice.

Pressed for time? The entire thing can take less than 15 minutes if that’s all you have. Whether it’s ten minutes or an hour, give what you can. With each day you’ll discover more about yourself, which will allow you to get more specific with whatever it is that you want for yourself in this life. It all starts with giving yourself time to know yourself, and your feelings. 

Want a partner in the process of setting up a daily practice? Join me for a Zoom Night for Men on September 28th at 8pm EST. REGISTER HERE 

Ready To Be A Coach?

One of our values at JRNI is that we dare to be different. Our coaches like Joe ignore the expectations society tries to impose on them, and seek to live from their own truth instead. If you are ready to step into your power and you’d like some partners in the process, come check out JRNI Life Coach Training. Grounded in science, our ICF accredited program features authentic instructors, a robust curriculum, and business instruction to prepare you for liftoff.

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Podcast
What are Restorative Practices and How Do We Use Them?
Applying principles of social justice to your coaching practice
Team JRNI
Sep 17, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Podcast
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

The Everything Life Coaching Podcast, featuring JRNI Coaching founders John Kim and Noelle Cordeaux, is a deep dive into the experience and business of being a life coach. In this episode, we’re exploring the intersection between social sciences and coaching, and how we can use restorative practices to repair harm and deepen connection between individuals and groups. Subscribe to get new episodes weekly!

“Restorative practice” has become something of a buzzword coming out of the pandemic. From stark examples of racial inequity and social injustice, to the struggle of parents and small businesses to keep their heads above water, a spotlight has been turned onto many aspects of our society that aren’t OK. More people than ever before are speaking out, calling for change.

So where does the concept of restorative practice come in, what does it entail, and how might these tools relate to the practice of coaching?

“When I think about the word “restorative”, what comes to my mind is healing.” - John Kim

What Coaches Need to Know 

The idea of restorative practices comes to us from the social sciences, and seeks to address what we need as humans in order to thrive in community with one another. It’s a collaborative process designed to repair harm at the individual or communal level.

At its core, restorative practices offer us practical skills for taking individual responsibility for our behavior and its impact, while remaining connected to one another.

Restorative practices have been used for a long time in schools and social justice work for the purpose of keeping families and communities intact, and for building rituals around inclusion so that every person inside a group has a voice. The skills associated with restorative practices help people build stronger connections through participating in learning, decision making, inclusion, conflict management, repair and empowerment.

According to the International Institute for Restorative Practices, these processes ultimately help to:

  • Reduce crime, violence and bullying
  • Improve human behavior
  • Strengthen civil society
  • Provide effective leadership
  • Restore relationships
  • Repair harm

One really cool example of how this is playing out on the societal level is in Ireland. That’s right - the Island of Ireland has declared itself a restorative society, one that believes in and integrates restorative practices as a way of building and maintaining relationships, which enable health and wellbeing!

Restorative Practices and the Coaching Profession

Coaches are in a great position to support those who’d like to learn about and engage with restorative practices. It can be an especially powerful model to adopt when thinking about how a coaching client is experiencing harm in their own life, and what steps might be taken to resolve the situation effectively. It's also a great set of principles to embody in every aspect of lives.

The core tenants of restorative practices and ethical coaching are closely aligned. Many restorative practices have indiginous roots, and can serve us in every aspect of our lives in society. 

Essential restorative skills include: 

  • Appropriate body language 
  • Non-judgement
  • Emotional awareness/self-awareness
  • Listening with empathy 
  • Listening for feelings and needs 
  • Reviewing and modelling good practice
  • Restorative conflict management/resolution  
  • Restorative conversations/language use

The Five R’s of Restorative Practice

The five R’s are widely used as a coaching framework for effectively doing this work. What follows comes from The Conflict Center, a nonprofit organization supported by the University of Denver. These principles are not "new" - they are drawn from indigenous wisdom about how to be in right relationship.

1. Relationship

At the heart of every restorative process is a hurt relationship. Without positive relationships, it becomes more difficult for people to lead fulfilling lives. The person or organization that caused harm has negatively impacted the lives of real people and a real group or system. Once the person who caused harm becomes accountable for their actions and begins to make amends, the relationship can start to heal. 

2. Respect

If relationships are at the heart of restorative practice, respect is the key ingredient. Respect keeps the process safe. All involved parties are asked and then trusted to show respect for themselves and for others at all stages of the process. Participants employ deep listening, where instead of assuming we know what the other speaker is about to say, we focus instead on what they are actually saying. Even if we disagree with their thinking, we try to understand their perspective.

3. Responsibility

In order for restorative practice to be effective, everyone must grapple with their own personal responsibility. Participants must be honest with themselves and search deeply in their hearts to discover how they might have had a hand in the matter. Even if the harm was unintentional, the person who caused harm needs to take responsibility for their actions. Ultimately, taking responsibility must be a personal choice and cannot be imposed on someone unwillingly. 

Taking responsibility is painful, and it’s something we’ve been trained in our society not to do. Everyone screws up - it’s inevitable. We need to go back to these old practices of what it means to live in community with each other, and make it OK to take responsibility, to say “I wish that didn’t happen, but it did and I’m sorry.” - Noelle Cordeaux

4. Repair

After respect and responsibility have been established, the next step towards healing is the repair process. The person who caused harm is expected to repair the harm that they did to the fullest extent possible, while also knowing full well that not all of the harm can necessarily be repaired. The repair principle replaces thoughts of revenge and punishment, instead focusing on moving forward in a more positive direction.

5. Reintegration

In order to complete the process, the community/group/system allows the person who caused harm to accept responsibility and begin the reintegration process. The opposite of "cancel culture", reintegration encourages collaboration between the community and the person who caused harm, rather than using coercion and isolation. This process recognizes the assets that the person who caused harm brings to the table, and what they have learned through the process. By accepting responsibility and agreeing to repair harm, the person who caused harm creates space and trust to be reintegrated into the community.

Practical Application of the Five R's

In the accompanying podcast episode, John and Noelle discuss how these can be used in our personal relationships, including: parenting, friend circles, community groups, and in the workplace.

Ready to Become A Coach?

A lot of talented people like you dream of having a coaching business, but aren’t quite sure how to get there. We train and certify adventurous coaches, making sure you’ve got all you need to build a business you love and transform lives, on your terms. If you're ready to learn more about how to become a life coach, come check out JRNI Life Coach Training program

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Inspiration
How I Chose My Life Coaching Niche: A Lesson In Hope
Guest blog by Coach Graciela Moore
Team JRNI
Sep 15, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Inspiration
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

Guest blog by Graciela Moore

Graciela Moore

Graciela Moore is a motivational story-teller and creator of the Hope Series and the Hope Enthusiasts Club. She helps people thrive in  mindfulness, confidence and hope, by facilitating a transcendental journey into soul-alignment.

Graciela graduated from the JRNI Coaching Intensive in 2021. You can connect and follow her work on Instagram @SongofMyself.IG or explore her work on her website: www.SoMCoaching.com

A LESSON IN HOPE

Or... How I Chose My Life Coaching Niche

I was six-years-old and pretending to have a conversation with someone who wasn’t there. They were speaking to me in English and I was answering in English, although I didn’t know what I was saying since Spanish is my first language and the only language spoken in my house growing up.

That little six year old wanted to speak, she had a story to tell, she had a message and a mission!

Since that time, I’ve spent my whole life exercising hope (and growing into that concept). In so doing, I've learned a lot about waiting, and the patience needed to focus on the goal ahead... while still in the process of accomplishing it. It's something that I've been hyper-focused on since forever, really. The eagerness of being caught in the “in between” while you work on one thing and then the next.

From that first scene at six years old, let's fast forward 30 years.

There I am, in the middle of my training program to become a Certified Life Coach with JRNI Coaching. Putting in the hours, making the connections and spending a considerable amount of time questioning and pondering coaching niches and my unique "message" as a coach. I was on the cusp of discomfort; analyzing my past experiences one by one and still feeling like I was failing to make sense of it all.  

Despite all the homework exercises and the revelatory conversations I was having, I still had no clue how to narrow down a whole lifetime of experience into a single concept that would serve as my coaching “niche”. I remembered John Kim’s words in the Everything Life Coaching podcast episode Stop Obsessing Over Your Niche:

“Your story is your niche, so share it!” 

This insight allowed me to look at the experiences I had already highlighted in my life story, and find the common thread through it all. It gave me permission to ease up on the search, and to look within.

On a parallel note, at the same time that I’m trying to figure this “coaching niche thing” for my life coach certification, I received a call to talk about the topic of Hope for the members of my church. They could’ve asked me to talk about anything, but Hope was it. As I thought about it, I realized that this “hope thing” was not just about a speaking opportunity with my church. I decided to look at my coaching assignments through the lens of hope as well. 

I reviewed my journals from 15 years ago and found HOPE all over them! It was a signature theme in my life, and the thread that held my story together.

Through limitations and broken dreams growing up in Puerto Rico, hope was still at the center of it all. Hope was always the beacon of light beckoning me forward, to keep growing and working towards magnifying my purpose. I went through it all knowing, and hoping with all that I had, that I would make it to this moment.  

When it came to explore my personal story and how it might relate to choosing a coaching niche, I asked myself 3 questions: 

  • What matters most to me? 
  • What do I want to talk about? 
  • What do I want others to walk away with, after meeting with me? 

The answer was the same for all three: HOPE.

Just like that, that six-year-old island girl who grew up fantasizing about moving to the USA and creating a life of positive impact for other people was finally put to work on a legit purpose and a concrete path!

Just a few days after being invited to talk about hope, I tuned into the Everything Life Coaching podcast again. This time it was episode “The Value of A Coaching Session”, where JRNI co-founders Noelle and John discuss the values that we bring to the table as coaches. As they were talking about concepts related to confidentiality and the coaching relationship itself, I was really struck when John Kim added to that list “an injection of hope”. 

Two mentions of Hope in a single week? That was enough of a sign and confirmation for me that this was real, so I went for it. I sat down with my coach hat on and started investigating hope from a psychological perspective. From there, my Hope Series was born: “Creating and Maintaining Hope in Difficult Times” (or How to Achieve a Perfect Brightness of Hope). 

I believe that it’s important to understand and master the art of waiting for goals to manifest and good things to come. Why? Because I’ve learned that it’s what we choose to do in the "in between" time that makes all the difference. 

That’s what the coaching series I was inspired to create is all about. 

When we understand the neuroscience of it, what’s clear is that a mindset of Hopefulness can in fact be learned, practiced and maintained, just like any other good (or not-so-helpful!) habit.

Learning more about how neuroplasticity allows us to actually rewire our brains for hope was a huge source of inspiration for my coaching practice. It inspired me to come up with 31 daily affirmations and journal promptings, and to create a coaching space where people can actively come together, support one another, and practice hope together. 

In my work, understanding hope as a habit is a critical element in the process of goal attainment. 

It’s like everything else in life: it starts within you. What begins with self awareness evolves into something more: a change of heart. When we set goals, what we’re doing is not only making a commitment to pursue a particular outcome or course of action, but to also hold space for HOPE to work its magic.

As individuals, hope is the anchor that keeps us grounded every single day in between the present moment and the day when we reach any given goal in our life. Holding hope is essential for flourishing. Hope is my life, I’m working hard every day and still waiting for other things to come. 

As coaches, we can only be a vessel of hope for our clients after we master this concept for ourselves. Our own cup must be full before we can pour into others. I feel honored and blessed to be able to share this message and even privileged to hold a space of hope for others.

 Whether you are a coach, or are aspiring to become one, I invite all who are interested in building your Hope muscles to join me in Creating and Maintaining Hope in Difficult Times, a 6-week experience of reframing and hoping... together. 

Want to Become A Coach?

One of our values at JRNI is that we dare to be different. Our coaches like Graciela ignore the expectations society tries to impose on them, and seek to live from their own truth instead. If you are ready to step into your power and you’d like some partners in the process, come check out JRNI Life Coach Training. Grounded in science, our ICF accredited program features authentic instructors, a robust curriculum, and business instruction to prepare you for liftoff.

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Life Coaching
Want to Apply Positive Psychology to Your Life Coaching Practice? Here's How!
Tools to help your coaching clients thrive
Team JRNI
Sep 16, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Life Coaching
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

Wondering how life coaching and positive psychology are connected? If so, you’re not alone! Let’s start with some simple definitions to get clear about the differences, and where these two disciplines intersect.

What’s Life Coaching?

Life coaching is a partnership where a coach and client come together to accomplish a specific and measurable goal. Rather than telling the client “how to get there”, coaching holds that each person carries innate wisdom, and is capable of developing their own answers. As coaches, we assist this process by helping our clients think strategically, identify self-imposed limitations, and overcome roadblocks.

The Goal of Coaching is to help clients reach a state of flourishing through goal accomplishment.

What’s Positive Psychology?

Positive psychology is the science behind how individuals and groups flourish and thrive. It’s the study of emotions, behaviors and beliefs that emphasize human strengths rather than weaknesses. Positive psychology provides new empirical data and specific tools to help people move along a continuum from “baseline wellness” to a state of thriving.

The Goal of Positive Psychology is to help us identify the goodness and strength inside ourselves, and find ways to lean into those attributes across all aspects of our lives.  

In Pursuit of “The Good Life”

The field of positive psychology is extensive, but it all boils down to a very simple central theme: improving our quality of life. Like coaching, the aim of positive psychology is to help us grow into ever better versions of ourselves. Each of these disciplines is centered around cultivating the internal qualities that help people achieve higher levels of satisfaction and contentment in life.

Both coaching and positive psychology start from an assumption of mental health and wellness, building toward a desired future state by tapping into a client's strengths and self-efficacy.

Wellness continuum - from suffering to flourishing

The field of positive psychology was catalyzed by Dr. Martin E.P. Seligman, who believed there was something important missing from the field of psychiatry. The concept of “flourishing” has been the subject of philosophical thought for thousands of years, but only emerged as the subject of serious scientific inquiry in the 1990’s.

At the time, psychiatry was predominantly focused on mental suffering, and ways of easing emotional pain in life. Seligman asserted that pain isn’t the whole story of the human experience. He championed the idea that the brighter side of life was also worthy of serious study! 

The work of Dr. Martin Seligman and his colleagues sought to discover how people achieve and sustain positive states of mind, which eventually became an entire field of study. We’re talking now about the good stuff: joy, love, gratitude, laughter, achievement and contentment (among others). 

Today, Positive Psychology offers us a scientific approach for understanding human potential, along with a set of research-based interventions and practices for achieving it.

How Is Positive Psychology Used In Life Coaching?

In positive psychology, the primary aim is to help us develop an inner toolkit for growth and life satisfaction that's rooted in our personal strengths.

This isn’t to be confused with a “Good Vibes Only” point of view! In this context, positive doesn't mean "happy all the time." The science isn’t suggesting we attempt to obliterate any trace of negative thoughts or emotions. Instead, we use them as a starting point for investigation. 

Understanding negative emotion is essential in life coaching because no matter what issue your client might be facing, negative feeling states will likely come into play at some point. Every one of us has a unique set of factors that catalyze our negative emotions, as well as how we experience them.

Left unexamined, negative emotions can get in the way of your client’s ability to develop insight, find solutions to challenges, and stay focused on what they want to accomplish. 

Much of our work as coaches involves recognizing a client’s inner voice of criticism, diminishment or self doubt, and helping them learn how to work with those thoughts more productively. 

Working with Emotions

When we’re applying any positive psychology exercise in a coaching context, our starting point must always be an assessment of client readiness. Before introducing an exercise or intervention, consider:

  • Is the client in a stable emotional place? 
  • Is there a desire and commitment to focus on the thoughts and conditions that will lead to improving their overall happiness and wellbeing? 
  • Is the client willing to do homework, and try new things? 

Making the Shift from Negative to Positive Emotional States

According to positive psychology coach and author Margaret Moore, if we want to understand how emotions shape our thoughts and actions, there are two main parts of the brain to take into account:

  • The prefrontal cortex is located in the front of the brain directly behind our forehead. This is our brain's logic center, responsible for driving our focus from one task to the next. 
  • The limbic system is a more ancient part of the human brain. This is where we process our emotions - both positive and negative.

FUN FACT: Positive emotions improve our prefrontal cortex functioning while negative emotions impair it. 

Unfortunately, negative emotions are "sticky" and positive emotions are "slippery". What this means is that we have to work hard to hold onto our positive emotions, while negative feelings have an irritating way of hanging around.

In brief? We lose hold of good feelings quickly, and need to work harder to release the more unpleasant ones. (Sad but true!)

Not only that, our negative feelings have the power to actually shut off the thinking part of our brain. Seriously! When the limbic system kicks in due to the onset of a negative emotion, the functioning of our prefrontal cortex is suspended. (Double whammy!)

According to Moore, there are two main sources of negative emotion that we need to recognize and know how to work with as life coaches: internal and external. Here's what you ought to know:

  • External: We all have our own triggers and responses to outside sources of stimulation. Think: traffic, noise, clutter, etc. One of the most important things you can do for your clients is to help them understand what consistently pushes their buttons and brings on feelings of irritation, frustration, anger or negativity. Coaching intervention:How can the client anticipate and mitigate their external triggers?
  • Internal: The other trigger is inside our own mind, where it can be nestled in deep and much harder to spot for ourselves! As coaches, we have many ways of labeling these thoughts, including: the inner critic, limiting beliefs and cognitive bias. You get the idea. Helping your client to recognize what their own unhelpful voices sound like is essential to gaining control over negative emotions. Coaching intervention: How can the client begin to disassociate from and neutralize the negative self-talk inside their own head?

The Power of Positive Emotions

What positive psychology research has shown is that positive emotions not only feel good, they also improve our health and enhance feelings of social connection. This in turn stimulates our vagus nerve, which oversees the parasympathetic nervous system.

What this means in plain English is that our emotions actually produce mental and physical outcomes that can have a big impact on how we experience life.

  • Stress and trauma activate the sympathetic nervous system, which governs our fight/flight/freeze response. 
  • Positive emotions can stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system, which oversees rest and digestion.

Think of positive experiences like nutrients. We need lots of them in order to create a constant flow of feel-good emotions that lead to lasting health benefits.

In other words, eating one vegetable a week is not going to cut it. In order to receive the full nutritional impact, you need a constant diet. And here's the good news: you don’t have to be a “naturally cheerful person” to experience these benefits! We can all intentionally cultivate positive emotions and enjoy their impact on our health and wellbeing. 

Here’s just a few examples:

  • Frequently experiencing joy drives us to acquire better and more diverse skills. 
  • Gratitude strengthens social bonds and skills for loving.
  • Serenity allows us to modify our self-perception and view of the world.
  • Hope brings increased resilience.
  • Pride unlocks motivation for achievement.
  • Amusement builds friendship and creativity.
  • Inspiration increases skills and feelings of morality.
  • Awe allows us to see ourselves as part of a larger whole.
  • Love impacts all of the above!

Positive emotions prepare us for growth by broadening our mindset. The more moments we experience inside a broadened mindset, the more we can fundamentally change who we are and become better versions of ourselves. As coaches, THIS is the state of mind we want to help our clients cultivate!

Want more on this topic? Check out the work of positive psychology researcher Barbara Frederickson in the blog Using Broaden-and-Build Theory In Your Coaching Practice

Coach’s Toolkit: Positive Psychology Interventions and Techniques

How does positive psychology help coaches? By providing evidence-based tools that can help drive lasting change and increase overall satisfaction in life. For life coaches who want a framework for helping their clients get consistent and measurable results, there are many effective interventions to draw from.

Positive psychology techniques coaches frequently use include:

  • Knowing and appreciating your strengths
  • Identifying personal values and priorities
  • Understanding your life purpose
  • Cultivating positive emotions and gratitude
  • Resilience and coping skills
  • Reframing a situation to recognize where you have agency, ability, and tools to make change
  • Self-acceptance and compassion 
  • Future visioning and working toward a “best possible future self”
  • Developing healthy habits and strengthening personal accountability

PRO TIP: Coaching Isn't Therapy

As we apply theories and tools from the field of psychology to the domain of coaching, it’s important to remember that coaching is not therapy. If the distinction between these two fields feels murky, check out: The Difference Between a Therapist and a Life Coach!

When working with people’s thoughts, emotions, and unconscious beliefs, we encourage coach practitioners to maintain a clear understanding of what we’re trained and qualified to do... and what we’re not. To that end, it's advisable to earn a coaching certification from a credible life coach training program. Our clients are best served when we learn how to apply the tools of positive psychology (and other coaching frameworks) ethically and responsibly!

Want to Become A Coach?

One of our values at JRNI is that we dare to be different. Our coaches ignore the expectations society tries to impose on them, and seek to live from their own truth instead. If you are ready to step into your power and you’d like some partners in the process, come check out JRNI Life Coach Training. Grounded in the science of positive psychology, our ICF accredited program features authentic instructors, a robust curriculum, and business instruction to prepare you for liftoff.

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Podcast
How To Build A Word of Mouth Coaching Practice
Tap into the power of personal referrals to grow your business
Team JRNI
Sep 9, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Podcast
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

The Everything Life Coaching Podcast, featuring JRNI Coaching founders John Kim and Noelle Cordeaux, is a deep dive into the experience and business of being a life coach. In this episode, we’re taking listeners through an interactive exercise to help build your coaching practice, step by step. Subscribe to get new episodes weekly!

The last time you needed to find a new dentist, or were looking for the next binge-worthy series to devour  on Netflix… how did you choose? Chances are, you asked around. 

When it comes to making a decision about how to invest our time and resources, most of us turn first to our networks for personal recommendations. That’s what “word of mouth” is all about: one person telling another about a great experience they’ve had, a book they loved, or a service they’d recommend.

Want to know just how powerful personal networks and word of mouth marketing can be?

Check out these statistics from Referral Rock:

As you're developing a marketing strategy for your coaching business, it’s critical to leverage your existing networks. But how do you do that, especially if you’re just starting out as a new coach?

In this podcast, John and Noelle conduct an interactive brainstorming session, and you’re invited to join along! Grab a paper and pen, and add your ideas to theirs as you work through the following prompts.

1) What is it that you want people to say about you?

EXAMPLES:

  • They’re a great coach - helped me through XYZ
  • This coach does X - they could help your team/business with Y
  • Listen to THIS podcast
  • Read THIS book
  • Check out THIS blog
  • THIS online course changed my life!

2) How will the people who you'd like to recommend you KNOW that you want them to pass your information on to others?

EXAMPLES:

  • You have a visible referral program
  • You tell clients, family and friends you are looking for new clients
  • You give gifts of appreciation with discounts to clients, family and friends
  • You offer an initial complimentary session or services for trial and people hear about it
  • You are in dialogue with current clients about the right fit

3) What is the action you want people to take after hearing about you?

EXAMPLES:

  • Email, call or text you
  • Subscribe to your newsletter
  • Purchase an online course
  • Inquire about your services
  • Book a complementary coaching discovery call
  • Other?

4) Given the action you want folks to take, how will people who hear about you know what to do?

EXAMPLES:

  • Refer to your website
  • Seek permission to pass off their contact information
  • Collect referral information and reach out to prospective clients yourself
  • Accessible Typeform or online survey to capture interest
  • Sharable newsletter

5) What about Business-to-Individual referrals? Think “captive audiences”! 

EXAMPLES:

  • Business cards in coffee shops
  • Guest advertising in local spas, gyms, etc.
  • Guest speaking engagements 
  • Retirement communities
  • Special promos for professional/community/parent organizations

Word to the Wise: Consistency is Key

The business promotional actions you take aren’t just about the technology or marketing strategies. It also has to do with the way you live your life every day. Truly, the most important thing is to figure out the ways you’d like to show up IN your business, and then be that person... consistently.

We've all heard the stories of public figures who cultivate one "persona" online (approachable, warm, sincere, etc.), but show up quite different if you were to meet them in person (rude, dismissive, etc.) When it comes to establishing a sustainable coaching business, nothing will kill referrals faster than inconsistency.

A word of mouth business is built on a foundation of trust. Whether you’re on camera for social media, or casually walking into your neighborhood coffee shop, having consistency and being authentic are essential ingredients to your success in business (and life!)

What about new coaches?

If your existing client base is small, can a word of mouth marketing strategy work for you too? You bet... with one caveat! While word of mouth is one of the most effective ways to grow your business, it's not the only method to rely on - especially when your current client base is still developing.

Diversify your strategies for advertising your services, and focus first and foremost on delivering exceptional results for those early clients. Referrals can take a few years to build up a real head of steam. But trust us... as you cultivate a loyal following of highly satisfied former clients, that initial trickle of word of mouth referrals really does have a way of snowballing!

Hungry for more tips on how to create traction in your business and attract new clients? Explore these articles:

How to Find Coaching Clients: 11 Strategic Tips To Try

6 Ways A Strong Network Helps Your Coaching Business Grow

4 Secrets to Help You Sell Your Coaching Services More Authentically

Want to Become A Coach?

Launch your coaching practice right! Check out JRNI Life Coach Training - a program that's every bit as unique as you are. Grounded in science, our ICF accredited program features authentic instructors, a robust curriculum, business instruction to prepare you for liftoff as an entrepreneur, and fellow students dedicated to becoming a collective force for good. Check out some word of mouth testimonials from our alumni HERE!

 JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Health and Wellness
No Going Back: How Workplace Wellness Must Change Post-Pandemic
Employees are rejecting a return to status quo
Team JRNI
Aug 27, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Health and Wellness
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

The Everything Life Coaching Podcast, featuring JRNI Coaching founders John Kim and Noelle Cordeaux, is a deep dive into the experience and business of being a life coach. In this episode, we’re talking about how employee needs and workplace wellness are changing in the wake of the pandemic, and how the coaching industry can respond. Subscribe to get new episodes weekly!

As life coaches, it’s critical that we have a finger on the pulse of the cultural moment. Trends and attitudes are shifting rapidly in these times, with a growing sense of rejection around things "going back to normal" in the wake of the pandemic.

The past few years have changed many things for us as individuals and as a society.  As coaches we need to stay on top of what is happening in the collective so that we can streamline our content and services to meet the needs of real consumers during this unprecedented time.

In this blog and accompanying podcast, we’re taking a closer look at one area in particular where change is underway in remarkable ways: the workplace. Or to put it more explicitly, how people feel about returning to work in a world that has changed.

What Coaches Need to Know

Anxiety around returning to the workplace is real.

A recent report from the American Psychological Association states that nearly 50% of Americans feel anxious about resuming in-person interactions — vaccine or no vaccine. And survey results from Zoom and Survey Monkey found that 65% of folks who worked from home during the pandemic prefer a hybrid model vs. a full return to the office.

What is driving anxiety about returning to the office?

  1. Concern about exposure to COVID-19, which may ease as vaccination rates improve
  2. Loss of freedom, which will be a lot harder for employers to address

Concerns over freedom include sacrificing flexible schedules, as well as anticipated stress of going back to a commute. Experts have been stating for years: happiness and motivation at work usually comes down to autonomy. During the pandemic, many people got a taste of what greater personal freedom at work feels like, and there’s an understandable reluctance to return to business as usual.

The way work is structured didn’t actually work for a lot of us. Now that we have the irrefutable proof that we can be just as effective at delivering results while working from home it’s going to be difficult - and may not feel reasonable - to give that up.

Other things that are unsettling employees include:

  • Employer condescension. A powerful example of this can be found in the detailed complaint letter Apple employees sent to management, explaining why unilaterally dictating a return to work on prescribed days was insulting.
  • Uneven playing field. Women with children are worried that working mothers will miss out on promotions and higher wages due to new hybrid office structures.
  • Bias. According to Anti Racism Daily, “employees are experiencing anxiety about returning to the office, and experiencing microaggressions or criticism for their social justice perspectives.” 

These are the kinds of issues that we as coaches need to be prepared to address head on in order to soothe and support a global population in crisis.

Coaching for workforce wellness is uniquely positioned to deliver customized wellness support to employees at scale. Implementing a coaching culture in the modern workplace promotes high trust and high-engagement by empowering self-managing teams.

A New Definition of Workplace Wellness

There is no “return to normal.” Looking ahead, the way we work is likely to undergo a more sweeping and permanent change. 

A one-size-fits-all approach to employee wellbeing won't work in the future because every individual is different. 

Workplace wellness is moving away from hierarchical systems that offer support for only the highest-earning industries or most senior colleagues within an organization. There is a rise in demand for personalized wellbeing support and education.

This has come into stark focus during the pandemic. A recent McKinsey survey showed that 79% of respondents listed wellness as an issue of importance, with 42% considering it a top priority. The report further supports the idea that employees and consumers alike are concerned now more than ever about wellbeing, and expect customized interventions.

Workplace wellness is no longer optional. According to Welltodo

“The pandemic stripped everything back. Workplace wellness went from a ‘nice-to-have’ to a vital element of pastoral care for a business to look after its employees at a time of crisis.” - Arti Kashyap-Aynsley, Ocado Group Global Head of Health & Wellbeing

The question now is: who’s driving that bus?

The trick over the months and years ahead will be in figuring out where "workplace wellness" fits within a company's structure, and who delivers it. Arti Kashyap-Aynsley asks: “Is it in the boardroom, with the executive directors, operations, corporate social responsibility or HR? Wherever it fits, it’s no longer just an HR issue. It’s a business issue.”

How Coaches Can Contribute

This is a watershed moment, one where coaching services are poised to directly address vital business and industry needs. Implementing a coaching culture top-to-bottom helps all employees hold responsibility for, and contribute to, a shared environment that celebrates and offers support from a whole-person perspective.

To help a workforce reeling from the pandemic regain wellbeing, personalization will be key.

That’s where we as coaches come in! We bring the skills and training to help individuals recognize and understand their own unique blueprint, and develop a targeted resilience plan based on individual circumstances and needs.

Want to Become a Coach?

One of our values at JRNI is that we dare to be different. Our coaches ignore the expectations society tries to impose on them, and seek to live from their own truth instead. If you are ready to step into your power as a coach, come check out JRNI Life Coach Training. Grounded in science, our ICF accredited program features authentic instructors, a robust curriculum, and business instruction to prepare you for liftoff.

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Podcast
When’s the Right Time to Become A Life Coach?
Why we wait - digging into the science of delay!
Team JRNI
Aug 20, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Podcast
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

The Everything Life Coaching Podcast, featuring JRNI Coaching founders John Kim and Noelle Cordeaux, is a deep dive into the experience and business of being a life coach. In this episode, we explore the science behind why we delay, and how it relates to the question of when to become a coach. Subscribe to get new episodes weekly!

To do, or not to do. That is the question!

Many people think about becoming a life coach, but the truth of the matter is that only a fraction of them will actually do it. Let’s take a closer look at why that is, and what you can do to turn your dreams into reality.

The Science of Delay

Our orientation towards work, making choices, and attending to the myriad of things that call for our attention ultimately comes down to value. Or more specifically, the value that we assign to whatever it is we hope to accomplish - in the moment that we are considering taking action.

This phenomenon even has a fancy name that hails from the field of economics: The Subjective Theory of Value.

When we put things off, it’s often a result of our having made a subjective valuation. If our mental process were expressed mathematically, it might look something like this:

What I want in the future < Doing what feels good right now

What this means in everyday terms is that when we procrastinate, we’ve decided that the value of doing something else outweighs the task in front of us that will lead to some future value. 

One way to get out from underneath the pressure of the "now" versus the payoff of the future is to spend time reviewing and assessing the value judgments you are assigning in the moment. 

Example: Yes, scrolling through social media may hold a high value in the moment as an escape... but does it truly offer me dividends long term?

Likewise, if you have a long term goal that you want to achieve which will require numerous action steps and some heavy lifting along the way, you might take some time to build motivation first. Explore what kind of value you can add in this moment to bolster your ambition versus the comfort of inaction or stalling out.

FACT: Human beings often get value wrong based on proximity to satisfaction. 

It’s simple, really. The further off a reward for our action is perceived to be, the less likely we are to take that action. Case in point: most folks would rather accept roughly $80 dollars now than wait 3 months to get $100!

You probably won’t be surprised to learn that scientists have coined a term for this as well: Delay Discounting. As a species, we start to devalue our time and money based on immediate reward.

Suffice it to say, this is a very real factor in why we procrastinate! Getting something done is a delayed reward, so its value in the present is reduced. The further away the deadline is, the less attractive it seems to work on something right now.

So what’s the antidote?

One simple way to increase the value of completing a task is to make the finish line seem closer. For example, vividly imagining a future reward will actually help to reduce delay discounting.

Coaching Tip: Future visioning and vision board exercises are great for this, and are further supported by the science of priming. Want to learn more about how to do it? Check out our blog on Crafting A Future Vision.

Deciding WHEN To Become A Coach

Now let’s bring this back around to career decisions, and how we know when it’s “the right time" to become a coach. Let's start with a question:

How long have you been thinking about becoming a coach?

On average, our students think about joining the JRNI life coach training program somewhere between one month and one year. That’s a pretty big spread!

While all roads eventually lead to the same place, the distinction here is that the folks who dive in right away experience the immediate reward of having taken action in life. Those people begin building their practice a whole year ahead of those who circle our front door, waiting for a sign to get started.

We know from coaching theory that one of the quickest ways to alleviate the anxiety that comes from putting things off is to take a concrete action step towards your goal. There are many immediate unanticipated rewards that come from making the decision to get trained as a life coach. Here’s just a few:

  • Connection. Excitement is contagious, and joining a group of people who are also fired up about learning and transformation quickly outweighs the value of rumination and procrastination.
  • Exploration. Another immediate benefit is the application of new skills. As you apply what you're learning in real life, you begin to see the immediate rewards because the knowledge you're gaining in coach training is tangible.
  • Relief. A huge reward from taking action is that you break out of stagnation or feeling stuck. Instead of wishing for a different future, you're building it. And as you do, previously unforeseen pathways begin to open up for you. 

Once a student joins coach training, new possibilities begin firing right away. They begin to think about the kind of business they want to launch, start to see job opportunities they had never considered before, and get excited about building new partnerships and experiences.

The truth is, there is never a definitive “right time” for anything.

Time is linear and will pass.

Whether you are considering a change in career, relationship, or a move, the weight of a dream deferred eases with action.  When nothing changes - we experience decay. When we force change by assigning future value to the NOW, we engender growth and vitality. 

Need a few more inputs before taking the leap? 

These resources can help:

Ready to Get Started?

Launch your coaching practice right with JRNI Life Coach Training - a program that's every bit as unique as you are. Grounded in science, our ICF accredited program features authentic instructors, a robust curriculum, business instruction to prepare you for liftoff as an entrepreneur, and fellow students dedicated to becoming a collective force for good.

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Podcast
Examining “Toxic Positivity,” and What We Need Instead
Explore the roots of bright-side thinking, and where it falls short
Team JRNI
Aug 13, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Podcast
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

The Everything Life Coaching Podcast, featuring JRNI Coaching founders John Kim and Noelle Cordeaux, is a deep dive into the experience and business of being a life coach. In this episode, we dig at the roots of the term “toxic positivity”: where it comes from, and what we need instead. Subscribe to get new episodes weekly!

“The phrase “toxic positivity” refers to the concept that keeping positive, and keeping positive only, is the right way to live your life. It means only focusing on positive things and rejecting anything that may trigger negative emotions.” - Psychology Today

According to the Washington Post, the exact origins of the term “toxic positivity” are murky, but the idea is firmly rooted in American culture, which values bright-side, glass half full thinking. This notion of putting our troubles aside in favor of adopting a rosy affect is not uniquely American, however, nor is it particularly recent. 

Care for an example?

You’ve likely encountered the phrase “Keep Calm and Carry On,” a saying that was originated by the British government in 1939 as part of the effort to boost morale leading up to the second World War. Another slogan in the series that hasn’t gained as much modern attention is also worth recalling: “Your Courage, Your Cheerfulness, Your Resolution will Bring Us Victory.”

The purpose of the British Ministry of Information’s war propaganda was simple: to encourage people to remain calm in the face of adversity. No emotions, please. Just Stay Calm, everyone! 

Keep Calm and Carry On war poster

Fast forward to 71 years later, when two bookshop owners rediscovered an original “Keep Calm” poster in an old box and hung it up in their store. It attracted so much attention that they began producing and selling posters of their own.

The whole “Keep Calm” frenzy that started with those posters is driven in no small part by capitalism. Everything from books to “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” t-shirts. Other companies created similar products, and today such sentiments have become not just a commercial gravy train, but a requisite for human behavior.

According to Verywell Mind, other examples of “toxic positivity” include:

  • Guilt in response to feelings of sadness or anger
  • Dismissing others' difficult feelings
  • Hiding painful emotions
  • Ignoring your problems
  • Reciting positive quotes in response to difficult situations

During the past year, we’ve seen increasing pushback against these ideas and behaviors, particularly on social media. Set against a backdrop of a global pandemic and brutal social injustices, sentiments like “Keep Calm and Carry On” are coming across for many people as tone deaf at best. For some, it can feel like gaslighting - a minimization or denial of the emotional reality of our traumatic experiences.

But the term “toxic positivity,” alongside woke memes and cancel culture, has itself taken on an ugly tone that is meant to bully and silence others without understanding. A declaration of toxic positivity also shuts down discourse, and masks the nuance required for the hard and messy conversations that need to be had by all of us.

In this world, there are people who do wish to “keep calm and carry on.” There are also those who believe what's best is to burn it all down. Finding middle ground, it seems, is a necessary component for those of us who are committed to the preservation of our environment, our communities, a future for ourselves and our children, and ultimately, peace and contentment through radical liberation and joy.

Our real work requires collective reckoning, and this necessitates finding ways to meet and love each other through good times and bad so that we may join in facing our real enemies. 

Listen in as JRNI Coaching co founders John and Noelle grapple with the nuances in this episode of The Everything Life Coaching podcast.

Want to Become a Coach?

One of our values at JRNI is that we dare to be different. Our coaches ignore the expectations society tries to impose on them, and seek to live from their own truth instead. If you are ready to step into your power as a coach, come check out JRNI Life Coach Training. Grounded in science, our ICF accredited program features authentic instructors, a robust curriculum, and business instruction to prepare you for liftoff.

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Podcast
Helping Our Clients Flourish Means Balancing These 3 Things
Striking a balance between achievement, contentment, and pleasure
Team JRNI
Aug 6, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Podcast
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

The Everything Life Coaching Podcast, featuring JRNI Coaching founders John Kim and Noelle Cordeaux, is a deep dive into the experience and business of being a life coach. In this episode, we discuss positive psychology researcher Kate Hefferon’s theory of flourishing, and how to strike a balance between achievement, contentment, and pleasure. Subscribe to get new episodes weekly!

In positive psychology, we talk a lot about helping people “flourish.” But what does this mean in practical, everyday terms? Let’s explore the science of happiness, and a simple three point framework for achieving it.

The Problem With “Chasing” Happiness

In order to understand how we actually achieve and sustain a state of satisfaction in life, let’s start by exploring a common misunderstanding about where “happiness” comes from.

Many of us fall prey to what’s known as “impact bias.”

In everyday terms, this is our tendency to overestimate the initial impact and/or duration of an emotional event. We often link “happiness” to future events, like buying a new car or house, getting married, or passing an exam. We believe that when we finally achieve that thing we’re after, that we’ll “uplevel” to a new state of joy, contentment, or satisfaction.

Here's what the science has to say about that: it just ain’t so!

Major life events and achievements may provide some increased level of happiness, but the duration and intensity are far less than expected - typically around 3 months.

The reason for this is that we quickly adapt to new situations. In the scientific literature, this is called “hedonic adaptation.”

It is also worth noting that the majority of things that people believe will make them happy are either:

  • Societal check boxes (like marriage), or
  • Aspects of personal or societally recognized achievement (such as getting a promotion, or earning an advanced degree).

Know what happens when we strive after achievements and work to check off those boxes? In the pursuit of external goals, we often end up neglecting how we actually feel as we’re living our life right now

Instead of savoring the nectar of our present moment experience (the place where contentment actually resides), we get caught in our pursuit of the conditions that we think represent “the good life.”

In other words, we get stuck on a hamster wheel… chasing happiness but never quite arriving. As soon as the “high” of one achievement wears off, we replace it with yet another goal.

What Works Instead

“I used to think that the topic of positive psychology was happiness, that the gold standard for measuring happiness was life satisfaction, and that the goal of positive psychology was to increase life satisfaction. I now think that the topic of positive psychology is well-being, that the gold standard for measuring well-being is flourishing, and that the goal of positive psychology is to increase flourishing.” - Martin Seligman

Flourishing is a state of existence in which we are thriving - on our own unique terms. This is a state of being that goes beyond the momentary. It doesn’t require us to chase happiness, or  achievement a goal in order to feel it.

Sustained flourishing is a way of living that feels good, and results in balance and deep daily contentment.

Renowned positive psychology researcher Kate Hefferon offers a very simple and elegant framework to evaluate and cultivate a life based on flourishing - one that is both sustained and sustainable. 

What Heffernon proposes is that we recalibrate our sense of what happiness entails, and strike an equal balance between these 3 elements: 

  • Achievement
  • Contentment
  • Hedonic (pleasure)
Diagram of human flouishing: 1/3each achievement, contentment, hedonic

In western (specifically American) society, most of us spend the majority of our lives chasing achievement. When we put all of our eggs in just this one basket, we fall out of balance.

What do you think would happen if you spent all of your time ONLY chasing contentment or ONLY chasing pleasure? And yet, so many of us are taught to chase the holy grail of “achievement.”

It’s worth noting that contentment often gets left out of the conversation because achievement and pleasure are attention grabbing. And as much as we may like the sound of pleasure, it can get a bad rap thanks to our society’s deeply puritanical roots. Many of us unconsciously both covet AND fear pleasure, which means even when we “have” it… we don’t!

Applying The Theory

Achievement, contentment, and pleasure look and feel different for everyone.

When we coach using this framework, the first thing to know is that we’ll be contending with diverse, familial and cultural value systems around each of these categories. Our clients may need to undo a maladaptive relationship with the way they see achievement, contentment, or pleasure.

In our culture, we often prioritize appling our efforts to achievement, at the expense of the other two areas.

When it comes to the category of achievement, we certainly want to be setting goals and employing grit in order to achieve them. With that said, it’s impossible to apply even 80% of our capacity to more than one of these categories at a time. The purpose of this model is to find a more sustainable flow between all three.

As a coach, you can use this model to help a client take the temperature of their daily life.

  • In a given week, what’s the give and take between these three states?
  • Is there one that feels overemphasized?
  • Is another feeling particularly neglected?

The purpose of introducing this model is not to strive toward an idealized state of balance between these areas. Rather, the intention is to weave some aspect of all 3 into everyday life. The purpose of bringing mindful attention to all three is to invoke a state of thriving that can serve or facilitate different goal states - like marriage or passing an exam - while also accounting for the full expression of a life well lived. 

Want to Become a Coach?

One of our values at JRNI is that we dare to be different. Our coaches ignore the expectations society tries to impose on them, and seek to live from their own truth instead. If you are ready to step into your power as a coach, come check out JRNI Life Coach Training. Grounded in science, our ICF accredited program features authentic instructors, a robust curriculum, and business instruction to prepare you for liftoff.

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Life Coaching
4 Life Coaching Session Frameworks To Use With Clients
How to structure a productive coaching conversation
Team JRNI
Aug 12, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Life Coaching
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

While you certainly CAN step into a life coaching session with a client and “just see what happens,” if you're hoping to make a meaningful impact during that time can't in good conscience recommend that approach!

Coaching is a deliberate process, and it's the role of a life coach to make sure your client achieves their desired outcomes by the end of the coaching session. But how do we do this exactly?

Enter the Coaching Conversation Framework.

Good frameworks help us understand the coaching relationship from a process perspective, while also addressing the need for structure in the session. 

Now just because there’s a process running behind the scenes doesn’t mean we need to be rigid or uptight about it! YES, frameworks offer a system within which a life coach and client work together, but how this unfolds is both contextual and client driven. 

How YOU implement a given coaching framework will also be flavored by your own unique approach and coaching philosophy.

If you were to observe two different coaches using the same process, it will likely look and feel quite different! Each life coach has their own set of "powerful questions," along with an intuition around when and how to introduce various coaching techniques.

What this also means is that even if YOU were to use the exact same coaching framework to guide every single one of your coaching sessions, the conversations will play out differently with each of your clients.

For these reasons, we recommend holding a general process flow and session framework lightly in your head, while dancing with your client in the moment. This allows us to be nimble, holding space in whatever way best serves the client.

So What Are They?

You'll encounter a wide variety of coaching frameworks in the coaching industry literature and across life coach training programs. And while there's an abundance to choose from, all roads lead generally to the same place.

Here's the common structure that most coaching frameworks share:

  1. Establishing a relationship or partnership with your client that is built on trust, honest communication, and confidentiality. 
  2. Once a client’s goals have been clearly defined, all coaching frameworks include a phase in which insight development and/or action learning occurs. 
  3. Frameworks typically include a step that invites client accountability and commitment toward self-initiated change and continued growth.

At the start of your coaching session, it's important to have a clear understanding between the coach and client around the objectives for your time together. Everything else, including which framework you might want to use, flows from there.

Show Me!

In this guide, we've highlighted the 4 coaching frameworks that students learn in JRNI's life coach training program. They are:

  • The Hallway Conversation
  • WOOP
  • 5-Step Coaching Process
  • 5-D

Hallway Conversation

One of the most simple and effective coaching techniques for guiding a session, this one involves moving through just three questions with your client:

  • Where are you now?
  • Where do you want to be?
  • What’s getting in the way?

WOOP

Similar to the Hallway Conversation, this framework adds in a tactical element. In it, the coach guides the client in coming up with potential solutions to draw from when faced with an anticipated obstacle.

  • WANT – What do you want to have happen?
  • OUTCOME – If you get this, what do you envision for yourself?
  • OBSTACLE – What’s the mental block that has prevented you from getting what you want?
  • PLAN – What are you going to do when the block comes up?

Want to help really make it stick? Invite your client to keep the plan simple, and to repeat it to you three times out loud. Why is this important? In the absence of a plan, we are mostly likely to revert to our default behavior (old habits, mental blocks - in other words, the very things that have been keeping your client stuck!)

5-Step Coaching Process

This framework is slightly more complex than the last, and can be used to support a client in defining their goal or objective, and then making a plan to achieve it.

  • Set the Session Contract: Identify the specific issue the client wants to to address. What do you want to get out of our time today?
  • Future Visioning: Build positive motivation
  • ‍Strategize: Come up with action steps‍
  • Clear the Way: Identify potential roadblocks, and how the client might overcome them.
  • Recap: Go back over future vision, the plan, and agreed-upon action items for client accountability.

5-D Framework

Drawn from the field of Appreciative Inquiry, the 5-D Framework is a conversation model that helps your client develop a clear vision of what they’d like to achieve, along with the specifics of how to get there. A more complex model than the previous examples, this is one that could potentially span multiple sessions. For big dreams or goals, you could easily spend an entire session on just one of these steps.

Here’s how it works:

  • Define: What do you want to create?
  • Discover: What strengths and experiences do you have that can help make it happen?
  • Dream: What will it look like?
  • Design: How will you get there? 
  • Destiny: Experiment, learn, and evolve the plan.

Now let’s take a more detailed look at each of these steps.

1. Define: What do you want to create?

During an individual coaching session, this is where you nail down what you’re going to work on today. For a longer contract that will span multiple sessions, this is the point where you'd discuss the entire scope of work for the coaching engagement.

Take time with this to make sure as a coach you know the real issue. Sometimes this single question can take up most of a coaching conversation, and that’s OK!

2. Discover: What strengths can you draw from?

In this stage, you help the client explore where they have been strong in both the past and present, and how they can use those experiences to drive their vision forward. Some coaching questions to stimulate creative thinking about this include:

  • Tell me about your best experience with…
  • Tell me about a time when you felt alive and engaged… (get detailed: what made it so exciting, who was there, etc.)
  • Tell me about the things you value most deeply... about yourself, your relationships, and your work
  • Without being modest, what are you best at?
  • What are the key ingredients (internal and external) that enable you to be at your best?

3. Dream: What will it look like?

This is where we help our life coaching clients dream BIGGER. Dreaming begins with a thought: “What could be…”

When a person creates a really strong vision for their future, their subconscious responds to that dominant thought. It then begins to see possibilities and make connections that help bring that vision to fruition.

Here’s a coaching prompt to help get those juices flowing:

“Imagine that it’s 2 years from now, and everything you want to happen has happened. You’re calling me to update me on what’s going on for you right now. Tell me all about it!”

4. Design: How will you get there?

This is where we work backwards from the future vision and help our client identify the steps necessary to achieve it.

As life coaches, this is often the point where we need to let go and let the client drive. Our role isn’t to advise or come up with suggestions, but to hold space and ask questions that help our client figure out what they want to do next. Some questions to ask might include:

  • What’s an insight that you want to take away from this session? (something that shifted for you)
  • What’s the smallest level of action you can take based on that insight?
  • What’s going to give you some traction to move?
  • I have lots of exercises I could give you, but what do you want to do?
  • How do you want to monitor your progress? 

5. Destiny: What action do you want to take? 

This is the “rinse and repeat” element of coaching. As the client works their vision and action plan, they circle back in subsequent sessions to share what’s working… and what’s not. 

Ways you as a coach can support your client's forward momentum include:

  • Revisit the client’s future vision 
  • Tackle roadblocks as the client encounters them
  • Support your client in identifying possible solutions and making adjustments
  • Encourage the client to expermiment and identify new actions they can take

Which Do I Use?!

Whenever possible, try out new coaching frameworks and other interventions on yourself before introducing them to a client. To give a conversation framework a test-drive, just choose a specific issue from your life. Think of something where you really could use a dash of clarity! Then use the questions from these models as journal prompts, and work your way through the process.

Need additional coaching tools? 

Check out our resource guide Top Life Coaching Tools You Need for Your Practice. In it, we cover assessment tools, coaching exercises, positive psychology interventions, and more!

Ready to Be A Coach?

A lot of talented people like you dream of having a coaching business, but aren’t quite sure how to get there. We train and certify adventurous coaches, making sure you’ve got all you need to build a business you love and transform lives, on your terms. If you're ready to learn more about how to become a life coach, check out JRNI Life Coach Training program. Grounded in science, our International Coach Federation accredited program features authentic instructors, a robust curriculum, and business instruction to prepare you for liftoff.

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Life Coaching
Transcend Limiting Beliefs With Inner Child Work
Learn a technique to support clients in breaking free from limitations
Team JRNI
Aug 25, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Life Coaching
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

Guest blog by Kristina Woida

Kristina Woida

Kristina's journey to becoming a life coach started over 20 years ago. After a long struggle with depression, she found a healer and coach whom she worked with for a year and a half. The experience was profoundly transformational and put her on a trajectory of life-long learning around trauma, trauma recovery, self-acceptance, meditation, spiritual growth, and more.

Kristina now runs a successful coaching business where she helps clients release the limiting beliefs impressed upon them from our collective societal conditioning. She helps others rediscover their authentic self and their unique purpose. Kristina truly believes that everyone is a unique expression of source energy and we are all here to realize our divine purpose.

Kristina is a graduate of the JRNI Coaching Intensive. To follow her work, check her out on Instagram, @coachwoida or on her website, coachwoida.com.   

HOW TO USE INNER CHILD WORK TO RELEASE LIMITING BELIEFS

"Limiting beliefs" is a bit of a buzz-phrase these days. But what exactly are they, how did we get them, and, more importantly, how do we get rid of 'em?

As coaches, we use a variety of tools to support our clients in transcending their limiting beliefs. In this blog, I’m sharing my go-to method - one of the most effective tools I use with my coaching clients!

Where Do Those Pesky Limiting Beliefs Come From?

We create our initial belief system in childhood when we are super impressionable and unable to fully access our prefrontal cortex - the part of the brain responsible for higher level thinking, including the ability to take other people's perspectives. This stage of development is sometimes referred to as egocentrism, meaning we think that everything happens because of us.

For example, let's look at another being that is unable to take on another's perspective: my dog (no prefrontal cortex to be had.)

Imagine that I come home all frustrated and pissed off. I push open the door and am greeted by my happy, wiggley, lil dog. I proceed to push him out of the way, yelling at him to Leave Me Alone! 

Unfortunately, my dog does not think, "Oh geez, she must have had a bad day. I'm gonna make her a cocktail and draw her a bath."

No, my dog thinks, "Oh man, I did something wrong. She hates me. I'm a terrible dog. Oh no, now I'm peeing about it. Now she really hates me. I suck. I better go be quiet and cower in the corner."

This scenario is more or less the same thing that goes on when we are kids.

When mom, dad, teachers, friends, etc., have something going on in their world that causes them to lash out, instead of thinking, "Sheesh, project much, mom!?" we internalize the projected pain and make it our own. Then we reason that there must be something wrong with us and our behavior, and that's why this person is so upset. 

From the moment we are born we are completely dependent on others for our survival.

As such, we must keep ourselves in their good graces. When we perceive that we've upset our life-line (a.k.a. our caregiver) we will modify our behavior in any way we deem necessary to maintain our survival. 

Here’s what often happens next: we begin to believe we need to be small, quiet, perfect, helpful, loud, an overachiever, pleasing, aggressive, meek, etc., in order to be worthy of love and belonging. Regardless of whether the perceived necessary behavior is in alignment with our authentic self or not, we will perform our little hearts out in order to receive the attention, affection, and recognition we desire. 

These fear-based beliefs and behaviors are always accompanied by a second, rationalizing belief such as, "Clearly my true, authentic self isn't good enough, worthy enough, or important enough to get my needs met. I'm obviously a piece of shit and I'm terrified that people will discover this shameful truth about me." 

Voila, a limiting belief is born! 

These false and limiting beliefs get stored in our subconscious mind as truth. We slowly lose conscious awareness of them over the years and go about trying to be exactly what we think everyone else wants us to be, thus, betraying our authentic self over and over again. The result? Breaking trust within our most important relationship - the relationship we have with ourselves. 

No relationship can work if there isn't trust.

So now we're in a highly dysfunctional relationship with ourselves, and this can manifest as depression, anxiety, insecurities, narcissism, and more. 

No matter how hard we consciously try to create positivity and abundance in our lives, if our subconscious beliefs aren't in alignment with our conscious desires, we will rarely be able to move ourselves forward towards our goals and dreams. This can be wicked frustrating and cause us to feel defeated, which only serves to reinforce our limiting beliefs.

How Can We Get Rid of Our Limiting Beliefs? 

This can be a tricky endeavor since the subconscious mind is difficult to access. First things first, we need to uncover our limiting beliefs as we are often completely unaware they even exist. There are three ways in which I've found to do this: 

  • Emotional overreactions
  • Acknowledged insecurities
  • Our judgments of others (a.k.a. unacknowledged insecurities)

For our purposes here today, I’m going to use emotional overreactions as a jumping off point. 

When you are emotionally charged or triggered by a present day event and have a bit of an emotional overreaction, this is a sign that there is an old emotional wound involved. The reason for the overreaction is because the current day event bumped up against an old wound and so you are reacting to the pain of the old wound and not just the pain of the current day event. 

When this happens, it is a gift!

This gift allows you the opportunity to heal the old emotional wound and release its accompanying limiting beliefs. The method I use to heal and release is often referred to as inner-child work. And, it goes a little something like this…

How To Do Inner Child Work

STEP 1

When you are having an emotional overreaction, sit in the feeling of the emotion. Be present with the physical sensations of the emotion. You can even do this after the fact, if you can’t do it in the moment. If it’s after the fact, then just close your eyes, recall the incident that led to the overreaction, and pull up the emotions. 

Once you are sitting in the emotion and fully feeling it, ask yourself (or your client), “How old do I feel right now?” 

There is no right or wrong answer, just go with the first thing that comes to mind. Once you have an age in mind, ask yourself (or your client), “What was going on at that age that is reminiscent of this emotional feeling, and what was the story or meaning I gave this event? What did I think this event meant about me?” 

You may or may not be able to find the “originating event,” either way it’s fine.

STEP 2

Next, ask yourself (or your client), “What did my younger self need to hear at that time? What does my younger self need to hear now in order to change the narrative?” 

Most likely it's along the lines of:

  • It's not your fault.
  • You are loved.
  • You are worthy.
  • You are perfect as you are.
  • There is absolutely nothing wrong with you.
  • I love you.
  • You are not alone.
  • I am here with you and I have your back.
  • I'm so sorry.  

Remember, nothing in your childhood was your fault nor your responsibility... AND now that you are an adult, it is your responsibility to actively participate in your own healing. 

We are no longer back in the hurtful time; we are here now. Now is the time to process the emotions, change the narrative to something empowering and true, and move forward with more freedom to choose aligned responses and behaviors. 

STEP 3

Now, close your eyes (or have your client close their eyes) and bring up an image of yourself at the age you’re currently working with. Imagine your sweet, innocent, curious, loving, joyful, creative, adorable, younger self sitting next to you.

Open your heart space and cover your younger self with all the love you can. Begin to tell your younger self all the things they needed to hear at that time, tell them the truth. Oftentimes, our younger self really responds to being held and rocked while telling them all they need to hear.

STEP 4

When you are done speaking lovingly with your younger self, invite them to come home with you. When you were younger and created the limiting belief, you were most likely ashamed of yourself and your perceived transgression. When we feel ashamed of ourselves, we often banish or exile that part of ourselves. This is why it is so important to bring this part of yourself back home to yourself.

You can say things like:

  • You are safe with me.
  • I love you.
  • I will never leave you.
  • Please forgive me for abandoning you.
  • I’m sorry.
  • I will never do it again.
  • I will always and forever have your back.
  • You do not need to worry anymore.
  • You are taken care of, safe and secure with me.

Then integrate the energetic body of your younger self into your current energetic body. Take a deep breath and open your eyes. You did it!

Want to Become A Coach?

One of our values at JRNI is that we dare to be different. Our coaches like Kristina ignore the expectations society tries to impose on them, and seek to live from their own truth instead. If you are ready to step into your power and you’d like some partners in the process, come check out JRNI Life Coach Training. Grounded in science, our ICF accredited program features authentic instructors, a robust curriculum, and business instruction to prepare you for liftoff.

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Podcast
Naikan Therapy: How to Apply the Japanese Art of Self-Reflection in Coaching
John and Noelle share a coaching exercise drawn from Naikan theory.
Team JRNI
Jul 30, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Podcast
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

The Everything Life Coaching Podcast, featuring JRNI Coaching founders John Kim and Noelle Cordeaux, is a deep dive into the experience and business of being a life coach. In this episode we explore Naikan, a secular method of self-reflection that you can use to help clients develop increased awareness and gratitude. Subscribe to get new episodes weekly!

Naikan therapy is a structured method of self-reflection that was developed in Japan in the 1940s by Ishin Yoshimoto, a Buddhist minister. The word naikan translates as “looking within” or “ seeing oneself with the mind’s eye.” It was developed as a secular, contemplative practice that could be used by anyone, regardless of religious belief.

As a coaching intervention, Naikan can help clients step back and take a broader view of their life circumstances. By increasing awareness of the extent to which they give and receive each day, the practice supports developing a greater sense of gratitude and the desire to give and serve others.  

The adaptation of this exercise that we've used for this podcast focuses on relationships, and has been adapted from Greg Krech’s Naikan reflection exercise by Lucinda Poole and Hugo Alberts (Ph.D.)

How Do We Do It?

The following Naikan exercise can be applied to a client’s relationship(s). Here’s how it works in a nutshell: 

  • Process: The client reflects on the extent to which they have given to, taken from, and caused trouble within a specific relationship (for example, with one’s spouse, friend, or coworker.)
  • Outcome: The process may help to broaden the client’s perspective of the functioning of the relationship, and may increase feelings of appreciation for the other person.

During the process of doing this exercise, be aware that a client may experience feelings of regret and/or shame if they feel that they have taken more than they have given in a relationship. If this occurs, you can help the client adopt a growth mindset by exploring what they could do differently moving forward to ‘restore the balance.’

Naikan Coaching Exercise

During this process, you or your client are invited to reflect on:

  • What you have received; 
  • What you have given; and 
  • What trouble (if any) you have caused others in the past 24 hours. 

You can choose to reflect on these three themes as they relate to one particular person in your life, or it can apply to everyone you may have encountered during the past day. 

Spend at least 10 minutes on the exercise to come up with as many items as you can.

Step 1: What have I received?

Consider everything that you have received in the past 24 hours. How have you been cared for and supported by others? 

  • Was there hot water and soap available to you for your morning shower?
  • What kind of food did you eat? 
  • Did someone serve you coffee? 
  • Did your partner or a friend pay you a compliment? 
  • Did someone open a door for you? 
  • Did someone wash your dishes? 

Write down anything and everything that you received today.

Step 2: What have I given?

Now consider everything that you have given to another person, or the world, in the past 24 hours. Examples may include:

  • Smiling at a stranger
  • Picking up someone else’s trash 
  • Wishing someone happy birthday
  • Washing up someone else’s dishes
  • Asking a store clerk how their day was 

Reflect on your entire day and write down anything and everything that you gave.

Step 3: What troubles or difficulties have I caused?

Now take a moment to consider what troubles or difficulties you may have caused another person or the world. Examples include: 

  • Dismissing or being short with someone 
  • Running late for an appointment 
  • Cutting someone off in traffic
  • Criticizing someone 
  • Leaving the dishes in the sink for someone else to wash 
  • Keeping people waiting for a response to their emails or calls

Make note of the incidents and occurances where harm may have been caused.

Conclusion

"The act of reflecting on the degree to which we have taken from versus given back to others can give us new insight on how ‘indebted’ we are to the world in a way that can be useful." - Noelle Cordeaux

Reflecting on these three themes within the context of interpersonal relationships helps cultivate feelings of gratitude and appreciation. It also expands awareness of our moral relationships with others in terms of giving, receiving, and hurting. Holding mindful attention on these questions can foster a desire to give and serve others, and instill a greater sense of realistic humility. 

When using Naikan with coaching clients, additional support can be provided by the positive psychology literature, which offers data and interventions in the art of practicing gratitude, acting kindly, and developing resilience.

Episode resources:

Naikan Therapy: Applying the Japanese Art of Self-Reflection

Naikan Therapy: 3 Questions to Put Things In Perspective

Want to Be a Coach?

One of our values at JRNI is that we dare to be different. Our coaches ignore the expectations society tries to impose on them, and seek to live from their own truth instead. If you are ready to step into your power as a coach, come check out JRNI Life Coach Training. Grounded in science, our ICF accredited program features authentic instructors, a robust curriculum, and business instruction to prepare you for liftoff.

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Life Coaching
Top Life Coaching Tools You Need for Your Practice
A go-to collection of coaching tools & frameworks
Team JRNI
Jul 29, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Life Coaching
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

With just the click of a button, you’ll find a wealth of knowledge and resources available to life coaches online. From assessment tools to positive psychology exercises and goal setting techniques, there’s so much to play with... and potentially incorporate into your coaching practice! 

So how do you decide which life coaching tools to use? 

Assembling your go-to coaching toolkit is part of what makes this work dynamic and fun! The choices you make in this regard are best guided by the coaching niche you practice in, your observations of a client’s needs, and your own personal preferences and coaching philosophy. 

Case in point: what might be a really effective coaching tool for a life coach might not meet a client's needs in an executive coaching session. Whatever your specialty, you'll likely test drive several coaching tools before landing on the ones that feel right for you.

With that said... after training thousands of students, we’ve found that some life coaching tools pack a bigger punch than others! If you’re looking for a place to start, we’ve asked JRNI instructors and life coaches to share some of their favorites for this article.

In this resource guide, we’ll cover:

  • Assessment Tools
  • Coaching Session Frameworks
  • Coaching Exercises for Clients
  • Coaching Interventions
  • Coaching Business Management Tools
  • Resources & Continuing Professional Education

ASSESSMENT TOOLS

Before jumping right into a visioning process or life goal attainment strategies, it can be useful to discover more about the specific human you are working with! Most often conducted at the start of a new client relationship, assessments can be an efficient tool for gaining insight right from the start of the coaching journey. They offer both coach and client data and information about the client’s personal and professional strengths, preferences, values, and style.

Certain types of assessment tools, such as 360° feedback, provide a baseline you can return to throughout the coaching engagement to retest and measure growth or change. Others, like personality tests, will offer a more static view of an individual’s preferences, strengths, and temperament.

Often, a client will offer up insights they’ve gained about themselves based upon tools they use already, or an assessment they’ve done in another setting. As a life coach, you’re not expected to be familiar with every tool under the sun! When it comes to assessments, it’s most effective to develop some depth with one or two key tools for your practice, rather than attempting to understand every survey your clients have ever taken.

woman looking at computer screen eagerly

VIA Character Strengths Survey

Positive psychology research shows that consistently using our top 5 character strengths in a realistic manner leads to the experience of flow states along with the development of deep authenticity connection and contentment in life. Leaning into character strengths allows coaching clients to discover and access the virtues that make them tick.

If you’re going to use just one assessment tool, this is the one we recommend in JRNI’s life coach training program.

DiSK Profiles

The DiSC acronym stands for the four main personality profiles of the DiSC model: (D)ominance, (I)nfluence, (S)teadiness and (C)onscientiousness. Most commonly applied in business team settings, the DiSC tool provides a framework to help people better understand themselves and those they interact with. Application of this knowledge at both the individual and team levels can be helpful in reducing workplace conflict and enhancing interpersonal working relationships. 

Enneagram

The Enneagram is a personality typing system that offers insight into how people see the world and manage their emotions. It grapples with the fundamental questions: “Who am I, and how did I come to be this way?” Understanding your Enneagram type can be useful to the process of identifying core beliefs about how the world works, and your place within it. 

Myers-Briggs

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator has been in use for decades, and is often a go-to in business settings. It can be a useful one to know because many clients may be familiar with it already, and well versed in their MBTI "type". Rooted in Jungian theory, the Myers-Briggs is designed to help people understand themselves on a deeper level. It offers insights into a person’s personality makeup, preferences, and decision-making style. 

Saboteurs Assessment

This simple quiz to examines thought patterns to uncover how your thoughts may be leading to self-sabotaging beliefs and behaviors. It can be a helpful jumping off point to support clients in exploring unconscious limiting beliefs.

ACEs

ACEs stands for “Adverse Childhood Experiences”, and it is a short assessment that provides insight into how a client’s stress responses in the present may be influenced by early life experiences. This can be a particularly useful tool for providing trauma-informed coaching insights and support.

We highly recommend that a practitioner possess appropriate professional training in trauma before introducing the ACES assessment and attendant themes with a coaching client. If past experiences are clearly impacting present day wellness and functioning, make referrals to mental health providers as needed.

LIFE COACHING SESSION FRAMEWORKS

Coaching frameworks help us understand the coaching relationship from a process perspective, and address the need for “structure” in the interaction with our clients. Although frameworks offer a system within which coach and client work together, the goal attainment process is different for each person.

As coaches, our approach need not be prescriptive or rigid! Rather, we recommend holding a general process framework in your head while dancing with your client in the moment, honoring them where they're at.

You'll encounter a wide variety of frameworks from the coaching literature and in various coaching programs, and in our experience all roads lead generally to the same place. Most frameworks share common themes relative to the coaching process, which include:

  • Establishing a relationship or partnership that is built on trust, honest communication, and confidentiality. 
  • Once goals have been clearly defined, all frameworks include a phase in which insight development and/or action learning occurs. 
  • In general, most frameworks strive to foster accountability and commitment toward self-initiated change and continued growth.

In this guide, we're highlighting the 3 coaching frameworks that students learn in JRNI's life coach training program.

man and woman talking

Hallway Conversation

One of the most simple and effective coaching techniques for guiding a session, this one involves moving through these three questions with your client:

  • Where are you now?
  • Where do you want to be?
  • What’s getting in the way?

5-Step Coaching Process

This framework is slightly more complex than the last, and can be used to support a client with visioning and planning toward goal attainment:

  1. Set the Session Contract: What do you want to get out of our time today?
  2. Future Visioning: Build positive motivation
  3. Strategize: Come up with action steps
  4. Clear the Way: Identify potential roadblocks, and how the client might overcome them 
  5. ReCap: Go back over future vision, the plan, and agreed-upon action items for accountability

5-D Framework

This is a more complex model, and one that might span an entire coaching engagement rather than be "completed" in a single coaching session - though it can work in both contexts! Drawn from the field of Appreciative Inquiry, the 5-D Framework is a conversation model for helping your client develop a clear vision of what they’d like to achieve, along with how to get there.

Here’s how it works:

  • Define: What do you want to create?
  • Discover: What strengths and experiences do you have that can help make it happen?
  • Dream: What will it look like?
  • Design: How will you get there? 
  • Destiny: Experiment, learn, and evolve the plan.

EFFECTIVE EXERCISES FOR LIFE COACHES

Wheel of Life

The Wheel of Life helps a client clarify where they are feeling most satisfied, while also highlighting areas that may need more attention at this time. This is a quick exercise that provides a snapshot of where a client perceives themselves to be across 8 important areas of life, which could include:

  • Money & Finances
  • Career & Work
  • Health & Fitness
  • Fun & Recreation
  • Environment (home/work)
  • Community
  • Family & Friends
  • Partner & Love
  • Personal Growth & Learning
  • Spirituality

CRIPES 

Drawn from the work of Rob Dial, this process is similar to the Wheel of Life. It can be used by life coaches to help the client take a quick “life satisfaction inventory” across 6 areas relevant to goal attainment: Career, Relationship, Intellectual, Physical, Emotional, and Spiritual.

Reflective Journaling

Reflection is defined as “the process of stepping back from an experience to ponder, carefully and persistently, its meaning to the self through the development of inferences; learning is the creation of meaning from past or current events that serves as a guide for future behavior.” (Daudelin, 1996)

Intentional doodling and journaling by hand not only helps to clarify our thinking… it’s also an effective coaching technique that can help rewire the brain!

Core Values

Identifying and naming our top values can be a useful exercise for both individual and business clients. There’s a variety of tools for leading clients through this process. Some popular ones include:

SMART Goal Setting Technique

When it comes to goal attainment, people often fall short of the mark because they lack a clearly defined plan, outcomes, or timeline for completion. The acronym SMART can be used to help clients remember to set goals that are:

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Attainable/attractive
  • Realistic 
  • Time sensitive

Want MORE?

For more positive psychology exercises than you can shake a stick at, check out the resources available for life coaches at www.positivepsychology.com!

COACHING INTERVENTIONS

Reflection 

Reflecting is a technique in which the coach tries to really understand what the client is thinking/feeling/saying. There are many ways to mirror and reflect, and one of our go-to approaches is:

“Here’s what I heard you say… did I capture it?”

The experience of hearing another person say what’s been rattling around inside their head can help a client feel heard and understood, which itself often leads to new insights!

Reframing

Moving beyond simply reflecting what a client is saying, reframing offers an opportunity for your client to consider another perspective on a situation or belief. A good reframe can help a client disrupt patterns, or get out of a “story” they are telling themselves. As life coaches we respect, honor, acknowledge, and validate the client’s perspective… AND we also ask if they are open to another point of view.

A couple ways to do this might include:

  • I heard you describe what you’re seeing, and I’m seeing something in addition to that.
  • Are you open to another perspective on it?
  • What else is true about this, in addition to what you’ve shared with me?
  • What strengths do you know you have that will help you overcome this challenge?

Mindfulness

Mindfulness Coaching has become a niche within the wellness space, and it's important for coaches to distinguish the difference between practicing mindfulness ourselves and offering mindfulness as an additional modality of healing to our clients. If you'd like to teach mindfulness to others, we recommend specialized training. Some resources for exploring mindfulness for both ourselves as life coaches, as well as for client referrals, include:

Self-Compassion

It's often what's inside our heads that will prove to be the bigger obstacle to goal attainment than any external challenges or roadblocks that we may face. In these instances, the first step in overcoming internal barriers may simply be to befriend ourselves, exactly as we are. Not always as easy as it sounds, right?!

According to Dr. Kristen Neff, self-compassion “involves acting the same way towards yourself when you are having a difficult time, fail, or notice something you don’t like about yourself as you would with a friend. Instead of just ignoring your pain with a 'stiff upper lip' mentality, you stop to tell yourself: This is really difficult right now, how can I comfort and care for myself in this moment?”

Exercises coaches can use with a client to enhance their capacity for self-compassion include:

Limiting Beliefs

We all carry beliefs about ourselves that are false and limiting. The role of a life coach is to help lift these subconscious patterns and beliefs up to the surface where our clients can see them more clearly. Here's two effective techniques we recommend for helping clients identify and disrupt unhelpful internal thoughts:

Upper Limits Questioning

Based upon the work of Gay Hendricks, this is a process of helping clients identify the hidden barriers that are holding them back from goal attainment or the full expression of their gifts and talents.

Emotional Intelligence

As a life coach, our inner capacities around emotional intelligence and self regulation are paramount to our ability to successfully connect with and relate to our clients. A few tools you can draw upon to further build these muscles for yourself and with your clients include:

woman working in coffee shop

COACHING BUSINESS TOOLS

Whether you already have a successful life coaching business or you’re still in the process of building one, there's a dizzying array of tools out there to help you work smarter. From organizing projects, scheduling calls, to marketing services that better connect with your ideal client, odds are there's a product or service that can handle it for you. The trick is in researching which are best for your situation, and selecting your Must-Haves.

For a rundown of our favorites, check out: Tools of the Trade: Resources To Jump Start Your Coaching Practice.

In that blog, we cover:

  • Scheduling systems
  • Payment processors
  • Client management software
  • Website design & hosting
  • Social media tools
  • Content & project management
  • Video calls & webinars
  • Brand & marketing resources
  • E-learning platforms
  • Email systems
  • Blogs & podcasts
  • Professional training & certification

RESOURCES & CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR COACHES

Everything Life Coaching Podcast

Careers in Life Coaching: Options & Opportunities (includes a list of who's hiring coaches!)

Positive Psychology Exercises

Complete List of Free Coaching Tools

The Coaching Tools Company

7 Things To Look For In A Life Coach Training Program

READY FOR LIFTOFF?

One of our values at JRNI is that we dare to be different. Our life coaches ignore the expectations society tries to impose on them, and seek to live from their own truth instead. If you are ready to step into your power and become a coach, come check out JRNI Life Coach Training. Grounded in science, our ICF accredited program features authentic instructors, a robust curriculum, and business instruction to prepare you for liftoff.

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Inspiration
How To Get Started With Creative Journaling
Guest blog from clarity and creative journaling coach Nicole Momberg
Team JRNI
Jul 28, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Inspiration
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

Guest blog by Nicole Momberg

Nicole Momberg

Nicole is a recovering perfectionist and people pleaser.  After years of battling self doubt in a job she didn’t love, she rediscovered the power of journaling as a personal development tool.  Upon receiving her JRNI Life Coach Training certification in 2019, Nicole launched a coaching practice focused on helping others find clarity and trust their intuition.

You can follow Nicole’s work on Instagram @thetravelingcatalyst


The Benefits of Reclaiming Our Right to Write

I stopped journaling after my college boyfriend read my diary. It was filled with the darkest secrets imaginable to my teenage brain. I was so mortified, I didn’t pick up a pen to write again for nearly a decade.

As the years passed, I missed the feel of the pen scratching away on paper and the way my thoughts would flow as I fell into the rhythm of writing.

Gradually, I allowed myself to dabble with journal keeping again. I started small. The pages contained lists or superficial notes. I was scared to be too vulnerable lest anyone stumble upon my writing again. Eventually, I began to relax. My lists turned into paragraphs. Then questions. Then dreams.

Today, Creative Journaling is an essential part of my coaching practice and the number one tool I recommend to coaches and clients alike.

What is Creative Journaling?

Gone is the era of the cliched “Dear Diary.” Creative journaling goes beyond chronicling the day’s events. Rather, it helps you tap into your inner wisdom through a combination of drawing and writing.  

When you draw before you write, doodling becomes the magic elixir. It reduces anxiety and makes you more receptive to the coaching process. While countless researchers have studied the benefits of drawing or writing separately, rarely are they mentioned in tandem. I have found that combining the two processes yields incredibly therapeutic effects. 

The Benefits 

Drawing or doodling have health benefits similar to meditation. When you draw, your breathing slows and your heart rate decreases. The combination of observing your work and the physical practice of your hand moving across the page becomes an exercise in mindfulness. In this relaxed flow state, your levels of stress hormones decrease.

The best part is that the health benefits apply regardless of whether or not you consider yourself a “good” artist. Just the process of doodling is enough.

Drawing increases blood flow to the brain and has been shown to give you a little shot of happiness in the form of dopamine. This mood boost allows you to more readily embrace future visioning work. When your mood is elevated, you can really “see” yourself in a better place. From there, you’re more likely to take meaningful steps toward change.

Drawing and writing work in tandem to rewire the brain.

Writing allows you to become like a fly on the wall--an observer to your own life. Through writing, you are able to take a step back and see your current situation from a new perspective. In turn, drawing helps improve your brain’s neuroplasticity. As your thoughts jump between the right and left hemispheres, new neural pathways are formed. 

Simply put, when you draw before you write, you have access to creative problem-solving methods that you literally couldn’t think up before!

Journaling provides a form of self-coaching that’s accessible to anyone. Sure, you can get fancy art supplies and a leather bound journal to make your Creative Journaling process an indulgent, multi-sensory experience. But for under $6, you could acquire all the basics you need to get started. 

Simple Steps for New Journalers

I grew up journaling in a floral diary with a tiny key that I carefully hid away from my little brother. Because of that, it was easy to embrace the practice. Not everyone is ready to make the leap and it can feel especially daunting if you're a novice journaler as an adult.  Here are a few tips to get you started: 

  1. Start simple: Just 5 minutes of basic doodling is enough to reap all of the health/mood benefits mentioned earlier. 
  2. Ask questions: Use your journal as a place to be inquisitive and list your questions, even if you don’t have the answers yet.
  3. Use pen: Whether you’re drawing or writing, there is therapeutic benefit to seeing your transformation unfold on the pages of a journal rather than typing on a device. Ditch perfectionism and show up messy!

For more inspiration, I welcome you to join me in the Creative Journaling Community: a monthly coaching membership where we focus on journaling for personal growth. 

Ready for Liftoff as a Coach?

A lot of talented people dream of having a coaching business, but aren’t quite sure how to get there. We train and certify adventurous coaches like Nicole, making sure you’ve got all you need to build a business you love and transform lives, on your terms. If you’d like to learn more about how to become a life coach, come check out JRNI Life Coach Training program

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

Podcast
Defeating Analysis Paralysis!
How to help coaching clients make snappier decisions and move forward
Team JRNI
Jul 23, 2021
This is some text inside of a div block.
Podcast
This is some text inside of a div block.
used cms

The Everything Life Coaching Podcast, featuring JRNI Coaching founders John Kim and Noelle Cordeaux, is a deep dive into the experience and business of being a life coach. In this episode, we’re diving into “analysis paralysis” - why it happens, and what you can do about it!


What is “Analysis Paralysis”?

“Analysis paralysis describes the process that an individual or group engages in when overanalyzing or overthinking a situation. This often causes forward motion in decision-making to become "paralyzed", meaning that no solution or course of action is decided upon.” - Wikipedia

Why Does It Happen? 

In psychological terms, analysis paralysis is considered an anxiety response. It is helpful to recognize these feelings as anxiety and name them: worry, fear, and rumination. Naming our feelings lets the prefrontal cortex wake up and disrupt a spinning brain! If you're finding it tough to stop overthinking, a therapist or coach can also help you identify underlying causes or triggers. 

What We Can Do

When caught in the grip of analysis paralysis, it often helps to understand why you’re having trouble making choices. Consider:

Did a previous decision not pan out so well? 

If you find yourself replaying a memory, you might have trouble trusting yourself to make a different choice moving forward.

Is the perceived judgement of others interfering with your ability to get clear? 

Many of us worry about other people judging us for making a certain choice. It's common to think that the “wrong” decision will affect your future or relationships with loved ones. Not only that, it can feel particularly tough to make a decision that affects other people. 

In these cases, it helps to normalize and validate how you (or your coaching client) is feeling. Most people find making a decision or completing a task challenging on occasion!

Tips to Overcome Rumination

Life is active. To fully live one cannot just “think”. One must DO. - Noelle Cordeaux, JRNI Coaching CEO

Set a decision deadline... with a default course of action

It can be helpful to establish a deadline for research, thinking, investigating, mind mapping, brainstorming or anything else you feel is important. When the deadline passes, stick with the default decision you chose in advance - unless you really got somewhere and changed the deadline based on real information or new outcomes.

Try something, change later

Just start. This involves making yourself engage in the task for a certain amount of time, before you can go back to research. This works well when you want to explore options, but can’t really learn more about them without actually trying something out. 

Pro Tip: Working with a coach is a great way to bust through the "thought-to-action" barrier!

Leave hard choices open-ended

The above strategies work on a principle of removing the rational objection to getting started. In the first, you’ve indulged in a reasonable amount of research time, so you can’t justify that you didn’t have time to think about it. In the second, you give yourself the option to back out, so you can’t complain that the decision is too weighty. In the third, you get started on the stuff that would be the same for either option, so you can’t use research as a reason to procrastinate.

Pro Tip: Taking action always feels better. Most things are not set in stone. There is value in pushing forward with a choice just to see what happens.

Further resources:

Healthline: How to Beat ‘Analysis Paralysis’ and Make All the Decisions 

Scott H. Young: How to Push Past Your Analysis Paralysis

Thinking about Becoming A Coach?

A lot of talented people like you dream of having a coaching business, but aren’t quite sure how to get there. Don't get paralyzed in indecision! At JRNI, we train and certify adventurous coaches, making sure you’ve got all you need to build a business you love and transform lives, on your terms. So what are you waitin’ for? Come check out the JRNI Life Coach Training program.

JRNI Coaching: Vibrant community. Evidence-based life coach training. Lifetime support.

STAY IN TOUCH

Sign up here and we’ll keep you up to date on the very best of JRNI, live events and everything you need for your own journey.

Remarkable inspiration delivered weekly to your inbox. No spam, we promise.

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.